You are here: Home - Remortgage - News -

Bank of Scotland tops mortgage complaints chart

0
Written by:
09/04/2014
The Bank of Scotland was the subject of more complaints about its mortgage products than any other lender in the second half of last year, new figures have shown.

Complaints data released by the FCA showed the lender was the subject of 15,075 customer complaints between July and December 2013.

Santander UK’s mortgage products generated 12,257 complaints in that period with Nationwide Building Society (5,236 complaints), Cheltenham & Gloucester (4,676) and Barclays (4,503) completing the top five.

The regulator received 2,479,029 complaints across all areas of financial services, a fall of 15% on the previous six month period.

More than half of these complaints concerned payment protection insurance with 1,390,756 issued reported between July and December. However, this figure represents a 22% decrease on the first half of 2013.

Barclays was the subject of 309,494 complaints in the latest period, more than any other provider. However, this number of complaints was 17% down on the first half of 2013.

Lloyds Bank, MBNA, Bank of Scotland and National Westminster Bank completed the top five across all sectors.

Martin Wheatley, FCA chief executive, said: “No firm wants to top this particular list and they all should be striving to ensure that customers are being treated fairly and not given cause to complain.

“This is an indication that firms seem to be putting customers at the heart of their business, however, there is clearly more for us all to do to show consumers their interests come first.”

There are 0 Comment(s)

If you wish to comment without signing in, click your cursor in the top box and tick the 'Sign in as a guest' box at the bottom.

Your Mortgage Guides

Your Mortgage Award Winners 2019-2020

Download our guide to the best mortgage lenders in the UK

Read More >

Read previous post:
Empty homes in England reach 10-year low

The number of empty properties in England has fallen to a 10-year low, according to government figures.

Close